Wednesday, September 3, 2008

Late Summer Flowers: One Hundred Species


NEARLY WORDLESS WEDNESDAY

This week I did some more searching out and photographing plants for the 100 Species Challenge. The first entry can be seen here, and the second, here. The numbered list for the first seven plants is found in the second post.


14.Solanum americanum, Black Nightshade or American Nightshade.
This poisonous plant is similar to the Horse Nettle, but the leaves are more ovulate and the stems are not spiny. The Nightshade Family (Solanaceae) includes tomatoes, tomatillas, and potatoes. Fruits in this family are often poisonous until they are ripe.













15. Yucca glauca (var.), Yucca or Soap Yucca.
Yuccas are succulents in the Agave family,
but they flower every year when the
conditions are good. Some agaves only
flower once in a lifetime.









16. Opuntia polyacantha, Prickly Pear Catus.

This cactus, a relative of the Cholla featured last week, is native to the New World, like all cacti. However, the Prickly Pear was brought to the Middle East, where it grows in the deserts as an invasive species. It is known in Hebrew as the "sabra." Native Israelis are also called Sabras because, like the cactus, they are prickly on the outside but sweet within.


17. Ipomoea purpurea, Common Morning Glory.

The morning glory family also includes the Sweet Potato and the Wild Potato Vine (aka Man of the Earth). This one is climbing up on an amaranth weed.






18. Castelleja ssp., Indian Paintbrush or Prarie Fire.
The species of this plant are often difficult to tell apart.
This species is the only type that I have seen in our area.
We usually call it the Scarlet Indian Paintbrush.
It is one of my favorite New Mexico flowers!

2 comments:

Kaber said...

I will be propigating a Prickly Pear from a cutting. wish me luck.
have you eaten the pads? I see them for sale at the farmer's markets.

Paula said...

I absolutely love summer flowers but I must admit there are some I am not familiar with here. I do not really have much of a garden, so I buy the majority of mine from online florists such as Flowersdirect. There are colourful summer arrangements available one of which has took pride of place on my kitchen table.